Move ur m00d on my mr.right the art of choosing diffuse anoxic brain injury

Click here to sheena iyengar’s blog

Her speech in TED talk.

Thought of sorting out my favorite episode, but I just couldn’t,

End up putting up the entire speech.

Each word in each sentence brings out crucial meaning and

Won’t be a whole if i try to separate them. (^_-)

Definitely worth investing my time reading her book.

Learned and realized a lot of things I’ve been wondering.

Got some hints and significant strength in making choice for the future,

Too much to gain from it.

Don’t used to read for pastime,

But ever since I met the art of choice,

It changes my life.

It’s like meeting the right one at the right timing with the right lighting bla bla bla


Since then, I started to love reading.

Thus I strongly believe, those who claim they don’t enjoy reading,

diffuse anoxic brain injury

One of the many reasons might be

They just haven’t met their mr.Right!! Haha

The key factor is obvious,

Me and the author are sharing the same thoughts/concept/ideas/values.

Therefore I agree easier with what he/she is trying to deliver

And able to apply/evolve the ideas shared and make full use of it.

Here is sheena’s TED talk speech :

• in contrast, asian-american children performed best when they believed their mothers had made the choice, second best when they chose for themselves, and least well when it had been chosen by miss smith. A girl named natsumi even approached miss smith as she was leaving the room and tugged on her skirt and asked, could you please tell my mommy I did it just like she said?Diffuse anoxic brain injury the first-generation children were strongly influenced by their immigrant parents’ approach to choice. For them, choice was not just a way of defining and asserting their individuality, but a way to create community and harmony by deferring to the choices of people whom they trusted and respected. If they had a concept of being true to one’s self, then that self, most likely, [was] composed, not of an individual, but of a collective. Success was just as much about pleasing key figures as it was about satisfying one’s own preferences. Or, you could say that the individual’s preferences were shaped by the preferences of specific others.

• for modern americans who are exposed to more options and more ads associated with options than anyone else in the world, choice is just as much about who they are as it is about what the product is.Diffuse anoxic brain injury combine this with the assumption that more choices are always better, and you have a group of people for whom every little difference matters and so every choice matters. But for eastern europeans, the sudden availability of all these consumer products on the marketplace was a deluge. They were flooded with choice before they could protest that they didn’t know how to swim. When asked, what words and images do you associate with choice? Grzegorz from warsaw said, ah, for me it is fear. There are some dilemmas you see. I am used to no choice. Bohdan from kiev said, in response to how he felt about the new consumer marketplace, it is too much. We do not need everything that is there. A sociologist from the warsaw survey agency explained, the older generation jumped from nothing to choice all around them.Diffuse anoxic brain injury they were never given a chance to learn how to react. And tomasz, a young polish man said, I don’t need twenty kinds of chewing gum. I don’t mean to say that I want no choice, but many of these choices are quite artificial.

• in reality, many choices are between things that are not that much different. The value of choice depends on our ability to perceive differences between the options. Americans train their whole lives to play spot the difference. They practice this from such an early age that they’ve come to believe that everyone must be born with this ability. In fact, though all humans share a basic need and desire for choice, we don’t all see choice in the same places or to the same extent.Diffuse anoxic brain injury when someone can’t see how one choice is unlike another, or when there are too many choices to compare and contrast, the process of choosing can be confusing and frustrating. Instead of making better choices, we become overwhelmed by choice, sometimes even afraid of it. Choice no longer offers opportunities, but imposes constraints. It’s not a marker of liberation, but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae. In other words, choice can develop into the very opposite of everything it represents in america when it is thrust upon those who are insufficiently prepared for it. But it is not only other people in other places that are feeling the pressure of ever-increasing choice. Americans themselves are discovering that unlimited choice seems more attractive in theory than in practice.Diffuse anoxic brain injury

• this brings me to the third, and perhaps most problematic, assumption: you must never say no to choice. To examine this, let’s go back to the U.S. And then hop across the pond to france. Right outside chicago, a young couple, susan and daniel mitchell, were about to have their first baby. They’d already picked out a name for her, barbara, after her grandmother. One night, when susan was seven months pregnant, she started to experience contractions and was rushed to the emergency room. The baby was delivered through a C-section, but barbara suffered cerebral anoxia, a loss of oxygen to the brain. Unable to breathe on her own, she was put on a ventilator. Two days later, the doctors gave the mitchells a choice: they could either remove barbara off the life support, in which case she would die within a matter of hours, or they could keep her on life support, in which case she might still die within a matter of days.Diffuse anoxic brain injury if she survived, she would remain in a permanent vegetative state, never able to walk, talk or interact with others. What do they do? What do any parent do?

• robert frost once said that, it is poetry that is lost in translation. This suggests that whatever is beautiful and moving, whatever gives us a new way to see, cannot be communicated to those who speak a different language. But joseph brodsky said that, it is poetry that is gained in translation, suggesting that translation can be a creative, transformative act. When it comes to choice, we have far more to gain than to lose by engaging in the many translations of the narratives. Instead of replacing one story with another, we can learn from and revel in the many versions that exist and the many that have yet to be written.Diffuse anoxic brain injury no matter where we’re from and what your narrative is, we all have a responsibility to open ourselves up to a wider array of what choice can do, and what it can represent. And this does not lead to a paralyzing moral relativism. Rather, it teaches us when and how to act. It brings us that much closer to realizing the full potential of choice, to inspiring the hope and achieving the freedom that choice promises but doesn’t always deliver. If we learn to speak to one another, albeit through translation, then we can begin to see choice in all its strangeness, complexity and compelling beauty.

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