Blog hypoxic brain injury recovery – monique evans

When my imagination runs wild and I’m worried about some terrible event, I frantically try to control everything around me. I live in south florida and mom lives in jamaica. There is no way I can control everything that goes hypoxic brain injury recovery on in her household. Unless I plan to get on a plane every week, I have no choice but to give up a lot hypoxic brain injury recovery of control. This was hard as heck for me.

This mantra, along with taking some deep breaths, doing what I can, and allowing family, home health aides, and doctors to do their part help me to steady hypoxic brain injury recovery myself and let go. I cannot change the geography of the situation for right hypoxic brain injury recovery now.


Accepting that long-distance caregiving carries its own brand of stress and guilt hypoxic brain injury recovery brings a shift in attitude and a measure of peace hypoxic brain injury recovery on my caregiver journey.

Expecting a sibling to bring the same level of energy hypoxic brain injury recovery and effort as the primary caregiver can be disappointing. I’m learning that not everyone can handle the downside of hypoxic brain injury recovery caregiving. Watching an aging parent becomes frailer and in need of hypoxic brain injury recovery more help is hard. I used to text my siblings to — call mom, go visit her, remember her birthday and mother’s day. If one of them forgets I took it personally.

We all have shortcomings and each of us deserves compassion hypoxic brain injury recovery and forgiveness, starting with ourselves. The author, ian maclaren said to be kind to everyone you meet hypoxic brain injury recovery for we are all fighting a hard battle. I don’t fully know my siblings “hard battles,” but I do know about compassion, forgiveness and withholding judgment…not perfect by any means. I’m in training. “everywhere I go, there I am“

Perhaps this is every caregivers’ fantasy, it’s certainly mine…run away to a foreign country where no one knows hypoxic brain injury recovery my name. I could start over. Write my story under a fictitious name. Sounds crazy, huh? But it feels good, for the few moments it last, until I’m nudged by the reality that it doesn’t matter where I go, who I am will always be inside of me. My history, the way I think, my beliefs and values, my strengths and insecurities. There is no escaping. No person or place will rescue me.

Years ago, I met a lady with the same birthday. “you are a december child, you must be clumsy.” she said, jokingly. I was slightly taken aback. I didn’t know that people born in december inherited the clumsy hypoxic brain injury recovery gene. Typically, I don’t accept labels, but there was something freeing about believing it’s not my fault when I hold a glass carefully hypoxic brain injury recovery and it still falls from my hand, bumping my head on the refrigerator door a million times hypoxic brain injury recovery or burning my hand on the stove while cooking. I just say, oh well, that december child thing again and go on about my hypoxic brain injury recovery business. Caregiving is enough responsibility, that mind-numbing pain from stubbing my toe is one less thing hypoxic brain injury recovery to own.

When was the last time you felt good in spite hypoxic brain injury recovery of your caregiving responsibilities, work, and other commitments? If you have a quick smile as you remember a hypoxic brain injury recovery recent burst of joy, then rock on, reach out and support another caregiver when you can. On the other hand, if you have to think too hard, then it’s time to start filling up your feel-good cup.

There can be many losses to process when you are hypoxic brain injury recovery caring for an aging parent or a spouse: the loss of the relationship you shared with your loved hypoxic brain injury recovery one before he or she got ill, during the illness and after caregiving is over. Grant yourself permission to grieve. Become familiar with the five stages of grief. Be gentle and compassionate with yourself. Allow time to process the loss in the way that’s healing for you. Accept support from friends and family. Be sure to get plenty of hugs. 2. Open your heart to love.

Take a day or a week to declutter. Pick out the clothes and other things in your home hypoxic brain injury recovery that you haven’t worn or used in years. Donate them to your favorite, local charity. Hire a professional if it’s too much for you. Invest in shoes and clothing that will last for a hypoxic brain injury recovery long time. And for sure, don’t buy clothes on sale that you plan to wear hypoxic brain injury recovery when you lose the extra pounds someday. Bringing order to your environment helps to clear your mind hypoxic brain injury recovery and lighten your load. 7. You are in control of you.

Disappointment and setbacks are part of the caregiver journey. Some obstacles are easy to overcome and others take more hypoxic brain injury recovery time. My four years as a family caregiver taught me plenty. One muscle I’ve strengthened is bouncing back from disappointment with a renewed hypoxic brain injury recovery determination to find another way. Let me share what I learned from a recent trip hypoxic brain injury recovery that may help you to recover quickly from disappointment in hypoxic brain injury recovery your caregiver role and other areas of life. It started with a lovely weekend of rest and relaxation.

I was on the second day of a yoga retreat hypoxic brain injury recovery in the berkshires, in the mountains of western massachusetts. Three days of healthy, happy self-care: yoga poses, whole foods, rest, fresh air, hikes and saying hello to plenty of trees. It was so nice to get away from too much hypoxic brain injury recovery thinking. Can you feel me? I had such a peaceful time I wanted to take hypoxic brain injury recovery something home with me.

The young woman at the counter said it was her hypoxic brain injury recovery favorite ring. She wanted to get it, but it was too big for her finger. I felt like the ring was waiting for me. I left the bookstore in good spirits; walked outside to show off my ring to my new hypoxic brain injury recovery friend from new york. She asked if the circle represented the “circle of life.” I’m not sure what that meant, but it sounded good to me. I smiled a “yes”. Oh no, my ring didn’t fit.

After a few minutes of enjoying the gentle evening breeze hypoxic brain injury recovery with my friend, I noticed that the ring was swirling around my finger. I turned it the right way a few times but hypoxic brain injury recovery it would not stay in place. Slowly, reality dawned that the ring was too big. It didn’t fit. I couldn’t have it. It wasn’t mine. How could that be? Reluctantly, I walked back to the bookstore.

I searched for the same ring in the right size. I found another ring just like mine, but it was too small. I tried on almost all the rings in the box, some more than three times, but none of them felt right. I clung to my ring. I switched it from finger to finger as I searched hypoxic brain injury recovery the box of rings one last time. I was aware that I was being a little ridiculous. I refused to give up. I was determined to take home a ring.

The young cashier stared at the new ring for a hypoxic brain injury recovery second; she said that the design of the new ring showed hypoxic brain injury recovery off the silver better. The new ring has geometric shapes intertwined into the shape hypoxic brain injury recovery of a flower. I wasn’t convinced by her explanation, but I bought the ring anyway. For the rest of the evening, I kept looking down at the new ring on my hypoxic brain injury recovery hand.

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