7 Reasons to bodybuild hypoxic brain damage treatment – guest post by menno henselmans – ketogains

At its core, if you strip away the competitions and the steroid usage, the bodybuilding lifestyle simply comes down to lowering your body hypoxic brain damage treatment fat percentage and increasing muscular size. This is achieved with heavy resistance training in combination with hypoxic brain damage treatment a controlled diet. Here are 3 reasons why you should consider bodybuilding in hypoxic brain damage treatment your training even if you have no interest in competing.

As per my review on the science of stretching, this is what really happens to your flexibility when you hypoxic brain damage treatment stretch a muscle: neural stretch tolerance increases. Basically, you teach the nervous system that it’s okay to relax the muscle a bit more when hypoxic brain damage treatment stretched. Most of the neural adaptation is simply an increase in hypoxic brain damage treatment pain tolerance. Contrary to popular belief, most muscles don’t come close to reaching their maximum length during most hypoxic brain damage treatment activities. The biomechanical structure of the human body simply does not hypoxic brain damage treatment make this possible.

So the only semi-permanent adaptation that takes place after stretching is neural. The length of your tissues stays exactly the same. You become more flexible becomes the nervous system is taught hypoxic brain damage treatment it can safely let you use more range of motion. And since this is a specific adaptation, you mainly just become better at the stretches you’re actually doing, with little transfer to other movements.

Olympic weightlifting and powerlifting don’t have much impact and are relatively controlled movements, so they have a severalfold lower injury rate. Yet when you’re lifting heavy weights close to your maximum capacity, even a minor slip can result in a serious injury. CrossFit doesn’t involve as much weight, but there is less control, more impact and more cardiovascular fatigue that makes it harder hypoxic brain damage treatment to maintain perfect technique.

Let’s define our terms here. In my experience, the way most people think about the term, regardless of how you specifically define it, ‘functional training’ refers to some measure of transferability of performance across activities. An activity is functional if it improves performance, defined below, in many other activities. So a leg extension is generally regarded as less functional hypoxic brain damage treatment than a squat, because leg extension strength doesn’t transfer well to many other activities, whereas a strong squat makes you better at jumping, sprinting, etc.

In the broad sense, as the term is used in fitness, performance generally refers to the ability to produce force during hypoxic brain damage treatment a given movement (= F in physics). This is straightforward for olympic weightlifting, powerlifting and crossfit, where someone’s score and force production are almost perfectly correlated. You move more weight, you get a better score.

However, it also applies in most sports: more force equals a faster sprint, a stronger punch, a higher jump, etc. Even an elderly person that has trouble standing up straight hypoxic brain damage treatment without shaking is a matter of force. Where we informally talk about ‘losing balance’, physically the problem is a lack of force production and hypoxic brain damage treatment increasing force production capacity is what solves the problem.

This may be hard to grasp for some people. Part of the reason for this is that our language hypoxic brain damage treatment is fundamentally flawed to understand biomechanics. We talk about strength and power as traits, when they are in fact skills. Strictly speaking, a person cannot be strong or be powerful. A powerlifter isn’t strong: a powerlifter has a strong bench press, deadlift and squat. Nor is an olympic weightlifter powerful: a weightliftes has a powerful clean & jerk and snatch.

Since the nervous system is highly movement specific in its hypoxic brain damage treatment function, that leaves muscle size as the main component of functional hypoxic brain damage treatment capacity. Muscle size is the only true trait that increases force hypoxic brain damage treatment production capacity without any limitation of movement specificity. If you make a muscle bigger, it will increase your ability to generate force during every hypoxic brain damage treatment movement that that muscle is involved in.

Secondly, the other thing bodybuilders excel at, which is achieving a low body fat percentage, is also strongly linked to performance during many movements. Given the same muscle mass, the lower your fat mass and thereby your total bodyweight, the higher your relative strength. This is particularly important during weightbearing activities, which basically includes all ground sports.

• major league baseball. Along with american football, these are one of the few sports that caught on hypoxic brain damage treatment to the performance benefits of being highly muscular early on. Between 1970 and 2010, the average BMI of baseball players grew by about 3 hypoxic brain damage treatment points. Linemen have increased in weight by over 50% between 1950 and 2010. Moreover, there is a clear upward hierarchy in size from the hypoxic brain damage treatment lower to the higher divisions of the sports.

• best of all, we have powerlifting and olympic weightlifting, the sports that supposedly stand in stark contrast to bodybuilding hypoxic brain damage treatment because they train for performance instead of body composition. To quote my previous article on this from a few hypoxic brain damage treatment years ago: “in olympic weightlifters, there is an extremely tight relation between body mass and hypoxic brain damage treatment performance [2].

As a final example the non-specific benefits of bodybuilding for performance, consider training for jumping performance. Many ‘functional trainers’ have argued that you should train quarter squats to improve hypoxic brain damage treatment your jump, because this is a movement that resembles actual jumping. However, full squats build more muscle and lead to greater increases hypoxic brain damage treatment in jumping performance than quarter squats.

At its core, rehabilitative exercise just comes down to increasing functional muscle strength hypoxic brain damage treatment without aggravating the injury. In part 1 you saw that bodybuilding is one of hypoxic brain damage treatment the safest sports in the world and that the most hypoxic brain damage treatment functional strength is in fact that from increased muscle mass. Voila, the ultimate rehab exercise recipe is very similar to bodybuilding.

Not convinced? Saner et al. (2015) compared a fancy rehab physiotherapy program to a general strength hypoxic brain damage treatment training program in patients with low back pain. They followed the patients for a year. At every measurement point, the general strength training program was just as effective as hypoxic brain damage treatment the special physiotherapy protocol at relieving pain and disability.

Anderson et al. (2008) compared the effectiveness of strength training to health counseling with hypoxic brain damage treatment ergonomics to improve posture and stress management as treatments of hypoxic brain damage treatment neck and shoulder pain in office workers. You might expect that posture was the problem, so targeting this directly with improved workplace ergonomics should be hypoxic brain damage treatment most effective. Wrong. Strength training was more effective at relieving pain in the hypoxic brain damage treatment shoulders and neck. It was also easier to stick to for the participants.

When you look at the kind of strength training that’s best, most research actually supports the use of compound exercises over hypoxic brain damage treatment specific rehab exercises. For example, rotator cuff exercises have become very popular in the fitness hypoxic brain damage treatment industry to improve muscle balance in the shoulder, but compound exercises are just as effective at improving muscular hypoxic brain damage treatment balance in the shoulder and compound exercises are more effective hypoxic brain damage treatment at improving overall strength.

Moreover, being lean also protects against diabetes and furthermore reduces chronic hypoxic brain damage treatment inflammation levels and corrects hormonal imbalances since fat tissue itself, especially visceral fat, negatively influences all of these systems in the body. If you thought fat tissue was just an inert storage hypoxic brain damage treatment depot of energy, read this article about the relation between fat and hormones.

Here’s an example of the 7 week progression of one hypoxic brain damage treatment my clients with non-competitive goals. In this period she took her 6 rep. Max on the squat from 159 lb (72 kg) to 201 lb (91 kg). The lighting isn’t the same unfortunately, but ask yourself, does she look more bulky on the left (before) or on the right (after)? She has more muscle on the right.

Yes, even if you primarily just want to lose fat. As I explained in my article on why diets fail hypoxic brain damage treatment and ‘eat less, move more’ is bad advice, bodybuilding is the most effective exercise form to get lean. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis supports that pure strength training is more effective than hypoxic brain damage treatment endurance training or even a combination of strength and endurance hypoxic brain damage treatment training for fat loss. On a side note, pure strength training was also best for your health.

Even beside the increased muscle mass and the increase in hypoxic brain damage treatment your metabolism, with strength training you can often simply burn more calories hypoxic brain damage treatment per session than with many popular ways to get ‘toned’. For example, a bodypump session burns 5 kcal/min for men with a BMI of 23.5 that are experienced with bodypump. If we compare this with strength training, men with a similar BMI burn 2.9 times as many calories per minute. So you can burn the same amount of energy in hypoxic brain damage treatment only about a third of the time. And this doesn’t even take into account the energy used to build hypoxic brain damage treatment muscle mass, the higher baseline metabolism of the strength trainees or the hypoxic brain damage treatment fact that the difference in energy expenditure will only keep hypoxic brain damage treatment getting greater as both groups get more advanced.

It’s easy to imagine a bodybuilder tearing off a doorknob hypoxic brain damage treatment or accidentally crushing a glass in his hand because he hypoxic brain damage treatment “doesn’t know his own strength.” yet it’s a complete myth that bodybuilding makes you clumsy. Research from smits-engelsman et al. (2008) and unpublished research from panjan et al. In slovenia show that the ability to control your force hypoxic brain damage treatment has no relation with how strong you are.

In fact, if anything you’d theoretically expect improved motor control in bodybuilders due to hypoxic brain damage treatment the positive neural adaptations that take place as you gain hypoxic brain damage treatment strength. Bodybuilders are also renowed for their mind-muscle connection. While we don’t have much research on this, bodybuilders have been shown to be able to control the hypoxic brain damage treatment contraction of opposing muscle groups at the same time better hypoxic brain damage treatment than untrained individuals.

Perhaps the most convincing research is that in dancers. Kudrna et al. From desales university have looked at the effect of strength hypoxic brain damage treatment training in female artistic dancers. The strength training did not impair their flexibility, posture or dance specific abilities, such as the height of the active and passive developé hypoxic brain damage treatment poses, but it did improve self-rated strength, posture and confidence during dancing.

ZAfter failing many different diets, due to lack of results or sustainability, aimee learned about the ketogains-style ketogenic diet from a friend. The fact that you could simply change the way you hypoxic brain damage treatment eat in order to get great results was very appealing hypoxic brain damage treatment to her. January 7th, 2016 was day one of her ketogenic diet. She has since dropped a significant amount of weight and hypoxic brain damage treatment is now sitting comfortably at 130 lbs.

Thirteen months after beginning her ketogenic diet, aimee joined a ketogains bootcamp and fell in love with hypoxic brain damage treatment lifting. Seeing the improvements to her body and mind has been hypoxic brain damage treatment a life-changing experience. She has been in every single consecutive bootcamp since she hypoxic brain damage treatment started and is now blessed to be part of the hypoxic brain damage treatment coaching team. Aimee is certified by the international sports sciences association as hypoxic brain damage treatment a specialist in fitness nutrition and she is preparing to hypoxic brain damage treatment enroll in the bayesian bodybuilding course.

Aimee is most passionate about helping people achieve their goals. She is especially interested in finding ways to help people hypoxic brain damage treatment realize their true potential and find the confidence they need hypoxic brain damage treatment to change their lives. She truly believes that sometimes people just need someone to hypoxic brain damage treatment believe in them in order to find the strength to hypoxic brain damage treatment succeed. Her mission is to help people do just that. Credentials